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The 2018 Motorama Custom Car & Motorsports Expo


As the first custom car show of the year Motorama marks the upcoming arrival of spring for hibernating enthusiasts of Ontario. Where the Autoshow is for the general automotive public Motorama is for us.

For the eager it’s a chance to show off what they’ve been up to all winter. And for everyone else it’s a break from our projects and a reminder that there are plenty of cool cars set to roam the streets or track in the upcoming season.

Always a busy event, this year I got through the door early on the show’s opening day to check out the show a few minutes before it was packed with people.

As a showcase of the best the show had to offer shooting the main hall is a challenge when the doors kick open.

My first stop in the main hall was actually to the Performance Improvments booth. While they were still setting up I said my ‘hellos’ and snapped some photos of Ted Barnes Datsun 510.

Barnes Motorsports and Performance Improvements have had a relationship for nearly as long as Ted has had this car.

Wearing refreshed colors the small block swapped drag prepared 510 looked better than ever.

It currently runs 10.405 at 130.80 mph, and Barnes Racing is constantly improving their program so it’s likely going to keep getting faster.

My next stop was to check out “Fine Wine” the latest build from Hitman Hot Rods. It’s an LS powered Task Force truck that sits on the lowered version of their made to order, chassis.

The team at Hitman thrashed to the finish line for this one with final assembly happening the week of the show.

The thrash was worth it because Fine Wine ended up taking home several awards including the “Grand Champion” award. Which is essentially the “best of” out of the entire show.

More importantly, the owner was absolutely thrilled with the build and is looking forward to driving the wheels off it when summer hits.

Whoever curated the front hall this year did an outstanding job. Something for everybody seemed to be the focus.

Hot rods, street rods, customs, there were even a few European classics in the front hall as well.

Keith, at Binbrook Speed shop, had two of his builds in the front hall in 2018. His own Binbrook Coupe and a customer commissioned ’27 Ford.

Both cars are done in the traditional hot rod style he’s known for.

It’s been super cool watching Keith get better, and better, at what he does.

I’ve already dropped the hint that I want to shoot both cars this summer so hopefully we can make that happen.

On Friday this “C7 Corvette” had the hood installed and naturally assumed there was an LS lurking within.

When I returned Saturday to find the hood removed I realized that I couldn’t have been more wrong.

Instead of a v8 there as an alcohol fueled Nissan six cylinder sitting between the rails of a custom chassis.

The Vette is a 10.5″ tire 1/8 mile car, and the latest build from local drag racing and restoration shop Chassis Shop.

Not big in the drag scene I’d never heard of them prior to the show, but now I’m certainly paying attention.

From drag cars to time attack cars Motorama had a fair-sized grouping of Motorsports vehicles.

Quarter mile, time attack heck even a few racing lawn mowers.

One of the feature attendees of this year’s show was Jeff Lutz who brought his latest build, a very bright, very fast ’57 Chevy. This car has a 540 big block with twin 98mm Precision turbos.

Around the big block is a mostly carbon fiber body save for the roof cowl and windshield frame.

Joining Jeff in the ‘Drag Week’ display was Dave Schroeder and his Corvette. His car runs a Pro mod motor, that’s 872 cubic inches, and has a ton of (four stages worth) nitrous flowing through it.

All that power, and of course a lot of driving ability is why Dave took home the Drag week title in 2017.

Oh he’s Canadian to boot, so score one for Canada.

One of the more interesting performance builds at the show was the Deboss Garage Audi Quattro.

Destined for the scrap heap the Deboss garage built this car to compete in a YouTube challenge organized by Superspeedersrob.

Today, as you can see, the Audi is LS powered. Despite that fact it retains its Quattro system thanks to a built Audi RS2 six-speed transmission.

As you’ve no doubt already noticed there is no radiator in the front, and in my hunt to find said radiator I found it and two compound turbos lifted from a Power Stroke diesel.

At the show the motor on the car was slightly hurt, but it should be all back up and ready to go soon. When it was in top shape the car made 694 hp and 550 lb-ft of torque.

All this insanity still wears plates, so it could, theoretically, still drive on the street.

The Dodge Dart that I often run into at Durham cruise ins was at also posted up at Motorama looking quite a bit different from the last time I’d seen it.Still running a blow through turbo set up the turbos have been lifted above the grill and heat wrapped.

I really ought to figure out exactly how much jam this car makes one day because there’s no way it’s not getting faster every time I see it.

The car was parked beside this C10 that was also set up for the 1/4 mile. It’s exciting that there are still plenty of cars left in Durham for me to check out.

Potentially as heavily modified as these two if not more.

Kevin and Dutch Grasley brought Thunderball to the show as part of a ‘barn find’ display.

The car got a lot of foot traffic at the event. A few of the people who stopped by even remembered the car from its heyday where it won some of the awards you see pictured.

Almost directly opposite from Kevin sat the Cadimax. A black bagged Cadillac sitting on Detroit Steel Wheels.

The Cadimax gets its name from the Duramax motor that’s been swapped in. I’m sure it gets a bit better mileage now versus the Caddillac V8 that usually sits under the hood of these behemoths.

Eddie’s Rod And Custom brought their split window, named ‘Split Second’ to Toronto for Autorama 2018. Split Second is a front hall worthy car that had previously debuted at the Detroit Autorama in 2017.

Exploring the rest of the halls I was impressed at the variety of vehicles that filled the halls.

I’ve wanted to see the above hauler trailer combination ever since it debuted at SEMA, but of a shame it was so tightly surrounded by metal guards preventing me from lining up the shot I wanted.

Reisinger Customs positioned two cars side by side, each, top caliber traditional hot rods. The blue Ford featured a huge flat head Lincoln v12. Supercharged the motor that was a thing of beauty.

With not much weight to the car I bet it would go like stink with the pedal to the floor.

One car that had a lot of people talking at Motorama was the Datsun 280z 2+2 that Splitfire Performance debuted.

Using the same tb48de Nissan motor the Corvette in the front hall had this car was also set up to be a straight line terror.

With an engine bay full of Vibrant Performance parts, a water to air inter-cooler and a giant Precision Turbo this car was a favorite of many.

There’s plenty more from Motorama to come next week, from Spring Fever, the tuner hall that takes place in the back.

Theme Tuesdays: Slammed Trucks Haulin’ Stuff: 3


It’s been about two years since the last “Slammed trucks haulin’ stuff” Theme Tuesday and that’s just too long. Call me crazy but I will forever find slammed trucks being put to work cool.

It’s a unique union of style and function and a bit of a middle finger to those still who think slammed trucks still can’t be put to task.

Work trucks are kind of popular now among the truck scene – Photo: Joshua Xipa Krause
Bagged, bodied, and a ladder rack – Photo: Chris Vogt
Draggin’ bumper, haulin’ wood – Photo: Billy Murdock
Slammed trucks are capable of hauling agriculture equipment too – Photo: Cody Fry
No matter what your truck is like, when it’s moving day someone is going to call you – Photo: Roger Griffith
A second gen slammed on Irocs will forever be a classic – Photo: Anthony Mendez
Photo: Anthony Mendez
Haulin’ on big wheels
Dannon Kornegay uses his bagged Ford to support his motorcycle business – Photo: Dannon Kornegay
Out on delivery – Photo: Dannon Kornegay
A big dually laying rocker is something I have to cruise in one day
Towing a project would be even better
I have to go to a show like LST one day and see these kind of set ups rolling in with my own two eyes
Another serious hauler ready to head out – Photo: Jason Lage
I don’t think Jason Thorbecke has ever actually pulled a semi trailer with his International but he’s posed with a few
I’m almost more stoked on the Rodeo, you hardly ever see those anymore – Photo: Chris Echel
Doucette Racing built this really awesome truck for their race team, it’s all aluminium modeled after a Maple Leaf truck – Photo: Cajun_Nitro
It’s a pretty wicked looking hauler – Photo: Cajun_Nitro

Seth Rosenthal, the owner of this truck beat cancer and plans to have this truck redone for SEMA 2018
The truck is going to transform into this and you can read more about his mission and story here

WTF Friday: Down And Out Dodge


I’m not sure how many of you pay attention to the lifted truck scene, but one of the current trends among those who go up are low offset wheels.

Like the aggressive fitment crowd these low offset wheels are wide and fit with stretched rubber. If you’re not familiar here’s an example:

To be perfectly honest I’m not sold on the look. I’d rather the traditional lifted look with taller rubber, but to each their own.

I’d never considered a wheel and tire set up like what’s above on a bagged truck. Apparently it looks like this:

The result keeps the wheels but skips the lift. The result is similar to the bagged pre-runner style Ranger from 2015. An interesting clash of two genres that somehow seems to work.

The wheels in this case are 22×14, which are typical for lifted Dodges but new territory for bagged ones.

I’m going to be watching this project with a cautious eye as I’m really curious to see what he does with the bedsides as I don’t think just a fender pull will work.

Do they make pre runner flares for Dodge Rams?

You can follow along to via instagram at @laceybro.og

If you’re curious the truck looked like this before hand.

Wonder what it will look like all said and done? Time will tell.

Theme Tuesdays: Detroit Autorama Pirelli Tire Great 8


Since Friday of last week I’ve been living and breathing the Detroit Autorama. Once again having the opportunity to cover the show for Rod Authority I made the best of it shooting nearly non stop for two days.

I am actually still working through most of my photos so most of my in-depth event coverage will end up over there. However I have wrapped up my articles on the Great 8 and Ridler winner.

This means I’m free to post some of my “b-Roll” here.

Chris Allen/Greg Allen – 1967 Camaro – “Nickleback”

There were two Camaros in the running for the 2018 Ridler award. This was pretty cool because it marks the first time in recent memory where two of the same model made the Great 8.

Nickleback is a 67 Camaro owned by Chris and Greg Allen. The car was built by Superior Autoworks and despite having a tragic name was a darn nice build.

Photo: rodauthority.com

Under the hood is a Magnuson supercharged LT1. The color is custom, and attributes to the cars name, and every bolt was custom machined.

Rhea and Harold Schrader – 1939 Ford Sedan Delivery – “Delivered On Time”

The only delivery in the bunch, this Ford was built by Hot Rod Construction and owned by two car show veterans.

This car was incredibly nice, but I thin being a delivery left a lot of people hot or cold about it.

Though the fact it was a delivery did allow for the use of Zebra wood in the cargo area. Hauling anything with this delivery is out of the question but it looked great.

Photo: Rod Authority
Photo: Rod Authority

A Ford motor doesn’t power this delivery. Instead power comes from a 5.7 liter Hemi. Trick.

K. Reid Hotaling, Mooresville, NC – 1940 Ford coupe

This Ford had a pretty cool story behind it. It’s actually the first car that the owner K. Reid ever purchased. He modified it a few different times over the years before deciding to take things to the next level.

This one was built by Farrel Creations and Restorations. Today it sits on an Art Morrison chassis and is fit with a ZLI big block.


Photo: Rod Authority

The motor was topped with a great looking induction system and was surrounded by polished aluminum and custom filler panels.

The Art Morrison chassis was smoothed, and painted with equal care as the exterior and the mirrored display showed it off well.

Robert Anderson – 1936 Pontiac Sedan – “Pindian”

This ’36 Pontiac Sedan was my wife’s pick of the bunch. It wasn’t a bad choice at all and I really thought it stood a great chance of winning.

Legens Hot Rod shop set out to build a car that stood out without being over the top.

Refined detail was the hook with this Pontiac. It looks simple at first glance but in reality is anything but and the more you look the more you see.

The coolest thing to me was the trim that started from between the grill and carried up and over the roof. It was a great defining feature.

Photo: Rod Authority

My wife on the other hand really enjoyed the combination of pearl white paint, gold, and brown leather.

Inside the interior was as one might expect, flawless, and featured one of the more interesting gauge clusters I’ve ever seen.

It’s a globe shaped piece with numbers that rotate around it.

It was built by Autometer and is the only one of its kind. After talking with the owner I don’t imagine they will be building another as it was quite intricate.

Power for comes from a supercharged LT4 and like everything else the underside is as clean as the topside.

Stuart Adams – 1969 Camaro – “Tux”

Tux, the second Camaro of the bunch, was absolutely mean. Built by Detroit Speed, Inc it was incredibly clean throughout and maintained most of the factory Camaro lines.

The stance was on point and the car tucked Forgeline wheels phenomenally. Under the hood was a Harrop Supercharged LS.

There were a lot of billet parts uses throughout (like the headlight covers) and Detroit Speed made a number of covers for the underbody.

One of which was removed and placed beside the car for display, shown above. I can’t imagine the number of hours that goes into a piece like that.

Ryan’s Rod And Kustom – 1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II – “Scarlet Lady”

You guys already know that I am a sucker for metal flake and this Lincoln had miles of it. The Scarlet Lady was actually the very first car I took a photo of when I walked into the venue.

It was also the only car not on stands for most of the event. The builders mentioned this is because a kustom belongs on the ground. Another bonus point in my books.

The car actually belongs to Chris Ryan, the owner of Ryan’s Rod Shop and he plans to drive the Coyote powered Lincoln after it does a small show tour.

Danielle Lutz – 1934 Ford

The only traditional hot rod in the bunch Jason Graham Hot Rods built this all steel 1934 Ford. A lot of people were pulling for this truck to win, and honestly if it wasn’t for the Lincoln, it would have been my pick as well.

Side profiles are a big deal, and this Ford had one of the most attractive side profiles of all the cars entered.

Photo: Rod Authority

This is thanks to numerous body mods. The roof was chopped 4.5 inches and the a pillars were leaned back to give it less of a boxy look. The cab was also lengthened which helped the proportions out.

Photo: Rod Authority

One of the coolest features, in my eyes anyway, was the axle running through the bed. Pretty trick touch executed beautifully.

Greg & Judy Hrehovsik, & Johnny Martin – 1957 Chevy 150 Hardtop – “Imagine”

When it comes to sheer number of modifications “Imagine” was the clear winner. It’s a 57 Chevy, but hardly looks like one at any angle.

Chopped, channeled, and wedge sectioned “Imagine” is a much lower profile car than the ’57 Chevy ever was from factory. This, along with the missing side trim, meant made it a bit of a controversial pick among die-hard tri five fans.

Regardless of visual preferences two things put this car over the top. The first was the fact that all of the joints on the car were connected via billet machined ball and cup sockets.

More often than not these ball and socket joints were mated to custom components, like the control arms above.

The other feature that put it over the top was the absoluteness ridiculous Nelson Racing Engines designed twin turbo big block.

It was designed to be an “enclosed” system which meant you couldn’t see any serpentine belts, or wiring, or anything of the like. It did all that while making over 1000 horsepower.

At an event like this not everyone is going to be happy with the winner, but if you had it your way which would you have put on top? Would it have been Imagine?

Would it have been any of the cars on this list?

Motor Monday: Everything In Excess


I just got back from the 2018 Detroit Autorama and two of the most talked about cars at the show were brought out by “Blown Mafia“.

Both owned by Brad Gray these cars are proof that anything worth doing, is worth overdoing.

The newest car in his collection is a triple charged LSX Ford Mustang.The 427 cubic inch motor is topped with Aria Hemi heads. Boost comes from a trio of Weiand superchargers.

A 871 in the middle is flanked by two 144s. The superchargers are windowed to reveal the water to air inter-coolers.

To triple (or is it quadruple at this point) down on the insanity the car also has a 200 shot of nitrous.

It even has a little bitty hood because why not.

Joining the Blown Mafia Mustang was Brad’s Camaro that uses a Littefield 1471 blower and two Precision 68mm turbos. It’s all fairly complicated but essentially the turbos feed the super, the super feeds the motor.

The supercharger in this case actually robs power, but from an engineering stand point, it’s a mechanical marvel.

Brad admits that both are show cars through and through. They’ve never made a pass, and never been on the dyno making them essentially art pieces.

Functional art is of course still art though.

Now Playing: The Bucket Seat Podcast


2018 is the year of the podcast for myself and Stance Is Everything. This time I make an appearance on a local podcast called The Bucket Seat.

The Bucket Seat is run by long time industry veteran Trevor Byrne. Trevor is a true gear head and we hit it off instantly.

We tried not to cover the same topics as my last podcast. If you want to learn a little more about what makes me, me, then give the episode a listen below.

If the embed doesn’t work you can check out Episode 40 of The Bucket Seat podcast on Shout Engine.

Theme Tuesdays: Recently Viewed – February 2018


I know I’m a few days early for this month’s edition of Recently Viewed but next week I will be neck-deep in Detroit Autorama coverage so I’m letting things fly today.

The second month of the 2018 was pretty darn good for videos. There’s plenty from the usual suspects. And for whatever reason it also seems that vehicle jumping was a reoccurring theme.

Wake up call to Brandon Roberts. Brandon Roberts… @leadkings

A post shared by Keith MacIntyre (@binbrookspeed) on

Rollin home through Arkansas. Vid by @dragitindustries

A post shared by ThorBros.com (@jason_thorbecke) on

Event Coverage: The 2018 Canadian International Autoshow


The Canadian International Autoshow is an event that I’ve been lucky enough to attend on Media Day for the past five years.

2018 however is the first year I noticed a significant change in the vehicles present. At first blush media day is fairly similar year to year. OEM manufactures bring out some of their latest and greatest while ushering media, from one press conference to another.

For many the show is little more than a break from a long bleak winter. So what change did I notice?

Well, I noticed that in addition to jamming them with technology more and more manufacturers are touting hybrid, or straight electric, vehicles.

This change hasn’t been sudden of course, but it’s the first time I really noticed it. Fuel prices, coupled with global warming and environmental consciousness in general, has really pushed manufacturers to make more efficient vehicles.

Tie that in with the numerous driving aids (advanced traction control, lane departure warnings, cameras everywhere) and stick shifts being an endangered species and the cars on the floor are far removed from the ones we enthusiasts traditionally covet.

It’s a weird time to be an enthusiast. If I were forced to choose a vehicle to buy today, brand new and within a reasonable budget, I have no idea what I would purchase.

New cars are changing so fast that I can hardly keep up. But it isn’t all bad. Not all of the new technology is being used solely for increasing miles per charge/gallon.

The Mercedes AMG-E One is a hybrid that is capable of 217 miles per hour. Sure it’s technology comes from F1, and not the street, but it still utilizes a very small, 1.6L gas motor coupled with four electric motors.

The electric motors sit at each wheel providing an incredible all wheel drive system that allows the car to run for 16 miles without fuel.

At a rumored 2.7 million asking price it’s not a car many will own but an engineering feat none the less.

On the other side of the spectrum you have to hat tip to Dodge for unabashedly appealing to v8 lovers with their SRT line of vehicles.

I have not given a Durango a second glance in years, but I gave their newest model a long look.

A 475 horsepower SUV with three rows of seating?

Not a vehicle I can justify, but one that I’m glad exists all the same.

And what more needs to be said about the Demon? The fact this car exists today is remarkable.

It’s basically a drag car masquerading as a production car, in a time where ‘performance’ models are often little more than aesthetic packages.

The Demon branded accessories you can get are pretty cool too. With the direct connection performance parts giving any Demon owner full access to –I assume– warranty approved speed parts.

If you’ll allow me to shed some more manufacturer praise for a second, shout out to Mazda for bringing absolutely flawless versions of some of their most popular chassis.

Most of the OEMs packed their main stage with current model vehicles so it was cool to see Mazda show love to their irreplaceable classics.

Especially considering the younger crowd looking might be blissfully unaware of their existence.

Kia brought out their new Stinger. The fact that Kia is releasing something like this is another indication that things have changed considerably.

Who would have called that Kia, of all brands, would be releasing a rear wheel drive 255-hp turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four, or 365-hp twin-turbo 3.3-liter V-6 powered Grand Tourer?

The interior looked pretty solid too. Korean interiors are usually quite ‘plasticy’ but this looked quite plush.

Obviously I couldn’t tell what the road noise would be like but all in all it looks like a fairly decent little car.

A far cry from the 2015 concept though. But, that’s how the cookie crumbles.

As I made my way through the main halls I was sure to snap a few details that caught my eye. I always intend to do more of this at each autoshow but I tend to forget because I see things like this.

Who wouldn’t get distracted by a monster Sierra on Matt Tracks?

I’m not sure how much the tracks are actually put to task, but since they are built at a dealership not far from me I could get a closer look at them if you guys are interested.

Popping out of the main halls and exploring some of the smaller ones, CSCS and Performance Auto And Sound magazine split a hall dedicated to the “Tuner” genre of vehicles.

PASMAG was running one of their Tuner Battlegrounds contests out of this room. All of the cars therein had to earn their way in via votes.

Neal’s R32 GTR was completely redone the end of 2017. This car was previously pink for those of you who may recognize the name.

It’s a pretty stark change, and exactly what Neal wanted after having the car the same for over ten years.

Dylan Sharpe’s competition S15 was the only non show car to make the top eight for the PASMAG Tuner Battlegrounds room.

This car spent most of 2017 competing in the states, so I didn’t get a chance to see it, but for 2018 it will be spending more time here in Ontario.

Under the hood of Dylan’s car is a big single 2JZ. In the Nissan bay, the Toyota motor makes about 900 wheel horse power.

True to Dylan’s style it is heavily detailed with lots of bling.

Interestingly enough this car has a fairly complete interior. A couple of panels have been cut to clear the cage, but for the most part it’s a very liveable car.

In fact it’s plated and insured so he can drive it on the street.

There’s a few cars local Ontario cars rocking Marlboro livery but this 300zx the only one with the Menthol colors.

Honestly the car pulls the livery off quite well and I am not a huge fan of  metallic vinyl.

The winner of the Autoshow Tuner Battlegrounds competition this year was this screen accurate replica of Jesse’s Jetta from the first Fast and The Furious movie.

A few people are upset about this car walking away with the top spot, but it is what it is.

I’m all about faithful screen replicas and this car was damn near a dead ringer. Including the screen used plate in the rear. Congrats to the owner for putting in the effort to win this social media contest.

Did you know Hot Wheels is celebrating their 50th anniversary? Neither did I but they were ringing it in at the Autoshow.

I’m sure this display was packed throughout the show’s two-week run, but on media day I got the change to try a few of the tracks out.

Somehow I didn’t immediately go and buy track after this.

They had a few 1:1 versions of their cars on display too. Not sure if these cars were built before the toys or vice versa.

Probably some well guarded chicken/egg secret.

As always the day ended in the Autoexotica room where the media reception is held. Having a few drinks and a couple of hors d’oeuvres with media folk surrounded by high-caliber cars is always a bit surreal.

This room is for some the only room worth attending because it’s cars you can’t go see at your local dealership.

I’m sure there are other places you can see a GT40, but a stone’s through from a storied Shelby? Doubtful.

In 2018 The Autoexotica room had two major showstoppers. The first is the carbon edition Pagani Huayra. Pfaff brought this car out and everyone was trying their best to get shots of this car.

The interior of Pagani vehicles blow me away. I imagine if you could sit inside a designer watch this is what it wold be like.

Eh, maybe that analogy doesn’t completely hold up, but either way they are ridiculous.

The Koenigsegg Agera RS made its Canadian debut at the 2018 Canadian International Autoshow. Naturally it too was a highlight of the Autoexotica room. Presented by Christian von Koenigsegg himself several people were lined up for autographs.

This is the car that managed to eclipse five existing production car speed records. Setting the highest top speed at 284.55 miles per hour.

It got there thanks to a pile of engineering, lightweight materials and twin turbo 5.0L motor that puts out 1160 horsepower on pump gas.

That’s basically 232 horsepower per liter. Which is truthfully pretty insane.

Similar to the Pagani, the interior is quite magnificent. Especially when you consider that the same interior treatment flows into the trunk that sits forward of the driver.

On a vehicle of this prestigious I guess you can’t really expect anything less than perfection.

Cheers to the Autoshow for another acceptance into Media day and thank you for being patient waiting for this coverage.

I started a new day job last week so the post schedule might be a little erratic for a bit, but don’t worry content will keep moving.

WTF Friday: Floor It Again Tony


For most of my youth –actually up until their Chrysler re-branding– Fiats were the butt of reliability jokes. The most familiar being “fix it again Tony”.

The joke was of course not all that funny, not all that accurate and perhaps a bit racist. But it was the 80/90s and darn near every joke ticked all the same boxes.

I’ve never driven a Fiat, nor have I ever seen one broken down at the side of the road. So my opinion of them is fairly neutral.

That is outside of a few pretty cool ones I have seen over the years, and this ’37 Topolino is one of the cool ones.

As you can see the silver Topolino is a far cry from its original form. In reality it’s actually a fiberglass body that mimics a Topolino.

Built by RCD Race cars the car has a roomy 112″ wheel base thanks to a custom 4130 cro-moly chassis. The front suspension is RCD inboard rocker arm while the rear is and RCD built four link.

As it’s size and shape suggests this car is not a canyon carver.

Instead it is built for the 1/4 mile, capable of low 9 seconds at 149 miles per hour.

Sticking through the hood is a healthy Rodeck 6 bolt main 406 cubic inch aluminum small block. Fit with BRODIX heads, new cranks and rods, and an 8 trumpet stack the car is no slouch.

A reverse manual valve body turbo 400 transmission backs it up, supported by a Ford 9 inch and upgraded center section.

It also fully opens up, just like a Funny Car would, to allow the occupants to get in and out and giving onlookers a gander at what lies within.

The car was quite successful in the early 2000 show scene wining a variety of Best engineered awards and shows such as the Detroit Autorama.

Now though, the Fiat for sale on ericsmusclecars.com waiting for the right owner to come scoop it up.

The 95k asking price isn’t chump change but, it looks like you get a decent amount for the cash. According to the owner 125k was invested overall.

If you want to take a look, click here to visit the ad, on ericsmusclecars.com

Using a Bead Roller and an English Wheel to make Patch Panels


Metal working is a skill I am extremely envious of. Cutting a patch panel with a grinder and zapping it in is one thing, but to making a panel look like a work of art? That not only takes tools I don’t have, but skills currently not in my wheel house.

Most of the panels I drool over on completed vehicles have some sort of bead rolling done to them. Bead rolling adds that extra custom touch to panel. It’s an extra bit of flare that works really well on any style of vehicle.

The Lange’s Shop firewall fillers I purchased for Project Why Wait are bead rolled. As is the bed on Classic Car Studio “Tiffany” C10 and the interior of the Distorted Vision Fargo project.

Getting started with a bead roller however is a daunting task. To remove some of the edge from the learning curve, and get you mastering your new shop tool, Baileigh Industrial sent through the following tips:

When working with older vehicles, rust is unavoidable and eventually certain panels will get to the point where they need to be replaced. In some cases, you could source the part and just buy it online, however with some vehicles that can be quite difficult.

In this situation, you might be tempted to just replace the panel with some sheet metal and be done with it. However, if you’re wanting to recreate the original look then there is a way; bead rolling.

Bead rollers use male and female dies to press form the metal into shape. Using this tool allows you to achieve the same intricate designs that were present on the original parts. Using a bead roller on a flat piece of metal will cause it to bend, but luckily there is also a solution to this problem. By using an English wheel on the areas that you intend to bead roll, you can stretch the metal so that when you bead roll, it will use the ‘extra’ metal to create the corrugations that you make.

In our example, we’ll be going over how to carry out this process on a flat sheet of metal:

Step 1 – Marking your metal

Before you do anything, its important to mark the desired bead lines on your metal. These will be your guide throughout the entire process.

Step 2 – The English Wheel

To prepare your metal for bead rolling, you’ll want to prepare it in the English Wheel. Firstly, put your panel into the wheel and tighten the wheel down so that it applies a moderate amount of pressure to the metal. Then, proceed to wheel the area that you would like to bead, ensuring that you keep your passes close together, trying not to stray too far from either side of your line (0.25” is about as far as you should go). Once you have done this, there should be a slight bulge in the metal where you have wheeled it.

Step 3 – The Bead Roller

To get your wheeled metal into the bead roller, then you may have to straighten it out by hand as the process will have caused it to curve. Once the panel is in the machine you can begin to roll over your lines, pushing the areas that you stretched with the wheel back down the opposite way. If you do this correctly, then you should end up with a flat, beaded panel.

Hopefully these tips, along with the video above, have helped you out with your next metal project. Balielgih tools are readily available online at retails like JEGS, and if you can think of another DIY fabrication topic that should be covered here on Stance Is Everything let me know in the comments below!